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Otherppl with Brad Listi

A weekly podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading authors. Hosted by Brad Listi.
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Now displaying: 2020
Jul 15, 2020

Genevieve Hudson is the guest. Their new novel, Boys of Alabama, is available from Liveright Publishing.

This is their second time on the program. They first appeared in Episode 544 on September 26, 2018.

Hudson's other books include the critical memoir A Little in Love with Everyone (2018), and Pretend We Live Here: Stories (2018), which was a LAMBDA Literary Award finalist.

They hold an MFA in fiction from Portland State University, and their work has appeared or is forthcoming in ELLE Magazine, OprahMag.com, McSweeney’s, Catapult, Bookforum, Bitch, and other places. They have received fellowships from the Fulbright Program, MacDowell, Caldera Arts, and The Vermont Studio Center. They are a Visiting Fiction Faculty member at Antioch University-Los Angeles’s MFA Program, a freelance writer, and also work in advertising. They live in Portland, Oregon.

Today's monologue: zero.

Jul 12, 2020

Wayne Koestenbaum is the guest. His new essay collection, Figure It Out, is available from Soft Skull Press.

Koestenbaum has published nineteen books, including Camp Marmalade, Notes on Glaze, The Pink Trance Notebooks, My 1980s & Other Essays, Hotel Theory, Best-Selling Jewish Porn Films, Andy Warhol, Humiliation, and Jackie Under My Skin. His essays and poems have been widely published in periodicals and anthologies, including The Best American Poetry, The Best American Essays, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Paris Review, London Review of Books, The Believer, The Iowa Review, Cabinet, and Artforum. Formerly an Associate Professor of English at Yale and a Visiting Professor in the Yale School of Art’s painting department, he is a Distinguished Professor of English, French, and Comparative Literature at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York City.

Today's monologue: minimal.

Jul 8, 2020

Joseph Di Prisco is the guest. His new novel, The Good Family Fitzgerald, is available from Rare Bird Books. It was the official May pick of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

Di Prisco has published four other novels (Confessions of Brother Eli, Sun City, All for Now, and The Alzhammer), three books of poetry (Wit’s End, Poems in Which, and Sightlines from the Cheap Seats), two books on childhood and adolescence co-written with psychologist and educator Michael Riera (Field Guide to the American Teenager and Right from Wrong), and two memoirs (Subway to California and The Pope of Brooklyn). His book reviews, essays, and poems have appeared in numerous journals and newspapers, and his poetry has been awarded prizes from Poetry Northwest, Bear Star Press, and Bread Loaf.

He is the graduate of a Catholic boys’ high school, Syracuse University summa cum laude, and the University of California, Berkeley, where he completed his dissertation on Mark Twain. He taught English for some twenty years, middle school, high school, and college. In other lives he has lived, he was a novice in a Catholic monastery, managed restaurants, been a wine consultant, and (when he was a young man who was broke in the ‘80s) played high-stakes blackjack professionally around the world for several years, bankrolled by big-money backers with multiple vowels in their names.

He has sat on, and consulted with, non-profit boards dedicated to children’s mental health, the arts, theater, and education. He is Board Chair Emeritus of Redwood Day School and Founding Chair of the Simpson Family Literary Project, a collaborative enterprise of the UC Berkeley English Department and the Lafayette Library and Learning Center Foundation.

He lives with his wife, photographer Patti James, and their two whippets (Raylan and Ava—yes, their names straight out of Elmore Leonard) in Lafayette, California.

Today's monologue: nada mucho.

Jul 5, 2020

Meredith Talusan is the guest. Her new memoir, Fairest, is available from Viking.

Talusan is an award-winning journalist and author. She has written features, essays, and opinion pieces for many publications, including The New York Times, The Guardian, The Atlantic, VICE, Matter, Backchannel, The Nation, and the American Prospect. She has contributed to several books including the New York Times Bestselling Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture, edited by Roxane Gay. She lives in New York.

Today's monologue: not much.

Jul 1, 2020

Brian Allen Carr is the guest. His new novel, Opioid, Indiana, is available from Soho Press.

This is Carr's second time on the program. He first appeared in Episode 135 on December 30, 2012.

Carr is the author of Sip (Soho Press) and other novellas and story collections, and he has been published in McSweeney’s, Hobart, and The Rumpus. He was the inaugural winner of the Texas Observer short story prize as judged by Larry McMurtry, and the recipient of a Wonderland Book Award. He splits his time between Texas and Indiana, where he writes about engineers and inventors at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. 

Today's monologue: brief, meaningless.

Jun 28, 2020

Natalie Diaz is the guest. Her new poetry collection, Postcolonial Love Poem, is available from Graywolf Press. It is the official June pick of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

Diaz was born and raised in the Fort Mojave Indian Village in Needles, California, on the banks of the Colorado River. She is Mojave and an enrolled member of the Gila River Indian Tribe. Her first poetry collection, When My Brother Was an Aztec, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2012. She is 2018 MacArthur Foundation Fellow, a Lannan Literary Fellow and a Native Arts Council Foundation Artist Fellow. She was awarded a Bread Loaf Fellowship, the Holmes National Poetry Prize, a Hodder Fellowship, and a PEN/Civitella Ranieri Foundation Residency, as well as being awarded a US Artists Ford Fellowship. Diaz teaches at the Arizona State University Creative Writing MFA program.

Today's monologue: wear a mask, and Natalie reads a poem.

Jun 24, 2020

Brady Hammes is the guest. His debut novel, The Resolutions, is available from Ballantine Books.

Hammes lives in Los Angeles by way of Colorado and Iowa. His short stories have appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Guernica, The Rattling Wall, and Harper Perennial’s Forty Stories Anthology

He’s also an Emmy-Award winning documentary film editor whose most recent project, Tom vs. Time—about NFL quarterback Tom Brady—won a 2018 Sports Emmy. Before that, he edited the feature film Social Animals, which had its world premiere at the 2018 SXSW film festival. For more of Brady's documentary work, please visit range-la.com.

Today's monologue: listener mail.

Jun 21, 2020

Spring Washam is the guest. She is the author of A Fierce Heart: Finding Strength, Courage, and Wisdom in Any Moment (Hay House).

Washam is a well-known meditation teacher based in California and Peru. She is considered a pioneer in bringing mindfulness-based healing practices to diverse communities. She is one of the founders and core teachers at the East Bay Meditation Center, located in downtown Oakland, CA.  She received extensive training by Jack Kornfield, is a member of the teacher’s council at Spirit Rock Meditation Center in northern California, and has practiced and studied Buddhist philosophy in both the Theravada and Tibetan schools of Buddhism for the last 20 years. 

In addition to being a teacher, she is also a shamanic practitioner and has studied indigenous healing practices for over a decade. She is the founder of Lotus Vine Journeys, an organization that blends indigenous healing practices with Buddhist wisdom. Her writing and teachings have appeared in many online journals and publications such as Lions Roar, Tricycle, and Belief.net. She has been a guest on many popular podcasts and radio shows. She currently travels and teaches meditation retreats, workshops and classes worldwide. She lives in the Bay Area.

Today's monologue: the stress and exhaustion of this moment.

 

Jun 17, 2020

Ashleigh Bryant Phillips is the guest. Her debut story collection, Sleepovers, is available from Hub City Press. It is the winner of the 2019 C. Michael Curtis Short Story Book Prize.

Phillips was raised in rural Woodland, North Carolina. She's a graduate of Meredith College and earned an MFA from the University of North Carolina, Wilmington. Her stories have appeared in The Oxford American, The Paris Review and others. Sleepovers is her first book. She lives in Baltimore.

Today's monologue: masks, masquerades, manners, dog business.

Jun 14, 2020

Roxane Gay is the guest. A contributing opinion writer for the New York Times, she is the author of several bestselling books, including Bad Feminist, Difficult Women, and Hunger.

Gay’s writing appears in Best American Mystery Stories 2014Best American Short Stories 2012Best Sex Writing 2012A Public SpaceMcSweeney’sTin HouseOxford AmericanAmerican Short FictionVirginia Quarterly Review, and many others. Her other books include Ayiti, An Untamed State, and the World of Wakanda for Marvel. She has several books forthcoming and is also at work on television and film projects. She lives in Los Angeles.

Today's monologue: listener mail.

Jun 10, 2020

Susan Choi is the guest. Her novel, Trust Exercise, is available in trade paperback from Henry Holt. It is the winner of the 2019 National Book Award for Fiction.

Choi’s first novel, The Foreign Student, won the Asian-American Literary Award for fiction. Her second novel, American Woman, was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. Her third novel, A Person of Interest, was a finalist for the 2009 PEN/Faulkner Award. In 2010 she was named the inaugural recipient of the PEN/W.G. Sebald Award. Her fourth novel, My Education, received a 2014 Lammy Award. Her first book for children, Camp Tiger, was published in 2019.  A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation, she teaches fiction writing at Yale and lives in Brooklyn.

Today's monologue: brief talk about upcoming episodes and the general state of things.

Jun 3, 2020

The podcast is dark this week, in light of the events of the past few days.

A few brief words on the current state of things, recorded in Los Angeles on June 2, 2020.

Back next week in some capacity.

Hang in there, everybody.

Peace.

May 27, 2020

Kristen Millares Young is the guest. Her debut novel, Subduction, is available from Red Hen Press.

Young is a prize-winning journalist and essayist whose work has appeared in the Washington Post, the Guardian and the New York Times, along with the anthologies Pie & Whiskey, a 2017 New York Times New & Notable Book, and Latina Outsiders: Remaking Latina Identity. The current Prose Writer-in-Residence at Hugo House, Kristen was the researcher for the New York Times team that produced “Snow Fall,” which won a Pulitzer Prize. She graduated from Harvard with a degree in history and literature, later earning her MFA from the University of Washington. She serves as board chair of InvestigateWest, a nonprofit news studio she co-founded in Seattle, where she lives with her family. 

Today's monologue: is shit opening up?

May 20, 2020

Chelsea Bieker is the guest. Her debut novel, Godshot, is available from Catapult Press.

Bieker's forthcoming story collection, Cowboys and Angels, is due out in 2022Her writing has been published by The Paris Review, Granta, McSweeney’s, Lit Hub, and Electric Literature. She is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writers’ Award and a MacDowell Colony fellowship. Originally from California’s Central Valley, she now lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband and two children, where she teaches writing.

Today's monologue: seeing a deer.

May 17, 2020

Chris Dennis is the guest. His new story collection, Here is What You Do, is available from Soho Press.

Dennis' work has appeared in The Paris Review, McSweeney's, Granta, Lit Hub, and Guernica. He holds a master's degree from Washington University in St. Louis, where he also received a postgraduate fellowship. He lives in Southern Illinois. 

Today's monologue: reminder to register to vote.

May 13, 2020

Mary South is the guest. Her debut story collection, You Will Never Be Forgotten, is available from FSG Originals.

South is a graduate of Northwestern University and the MFA program in fiction at Columbia University. For many years, she has worked with Diane Williams as an editor at the literary journal NOON. She is also the recipient of a Bread Loaf work-study fellowship and residences at VCCA and Jentel. Her writing has appeared in American Short Fiction, The Baffler, The Believer, BOMB, The Collagist, Conjunctions, Electric Literature, Guernica, LARB Quarterly, The New Yorker, NOON, The Offing, The White Review, and Words Without Borders. She lives in New York.

 

May 6, 2020

Danielle Trussoni is the guest. Her new novel, The Ancestor, is available from William Morrow.

Trussoni is the New York TimesUSA Today, and Sunday Times Top Ten bestselling author of the supernatural thrillers Angelology and Angelopolis. She currently writers the Horror column for the New York Times Book Review and has recently served as a jurist for the Pulitzer Prize in Fiction. Trussoni holds an MFA in Fiction from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where she won the Michener-Copernicus Society of America award. Her books have been translated into over thirty languages. She lives in the Hudson River Valley with her family and her pug Fly.

In today's monologue: celebrity baby-naming and dishonest foods.

Apr 29, 2020

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan is the guest. Her new novel, Starling Days, is available from The Overlook Press. It is the official April pick of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

Buchanan is also the author of Harmless Like You, winner of The Authors’ Club First Novel Award and a Betty Trask Award. It was a New York Times Editors’ Choice and an NPR 2017 Great Read.

Her short work has appeared in several places including GrantaGuernica, The Guardian, The Harvard Review, and NPR’s Selected Shorts. 

She lives in London.

In today's monologue, I talk briefly about the virtues of a weighted blanket.

Apr 22, 2020

Kevin Bigley is the guest. His new novel, Comaville, is available from Clash Books.

Bigley is an actor/author. He can be seen on such television as Amazon’s Undone, USA’s Sirens, as well as heard on Netflix’s Bojack Horseman. Currently, he’s starring in the new Greg Daniels show Upload, coming to Amazon on May 1st. He lives in Los Angeles.

In today's monologue, I talk briefly about taking a drive up into the mountains.

Apr 19, 2020

Juliana Delgado Lopera is the guest. Their new novel Fiebre Tropical is available from The Feminist Press. It was the official February pick of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

Lopera's other books include Quiéreme (Nomadic Press 2017) and ¡Cuéntamelo! (Aunt Lute 2017) an illustrated bilingual collection of oral histories by LGBT Latinx immigrants which won a 2018 Lambda Literary Award and a 2018 Independent Publisher Book Award. 

Their work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in Teen Vogue, The Rumpus, The White Review, LALT, Four Way Review, Broadly,TimeOut Mag, and more. 

They live in San Francisco.

 

Apr 15, 2020

Amanda Goldblatt is the guest. Her debut novel, Hard Mouth, is available from Counterpoint Press.

Goldblatt's work can lately be found at NOONFenceand Diagram. She was a 2018 National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellow, and teaches creative writing at Northeastern Illinois University

She lives in Chicago, with her architect partner, and no dog.

In today's monologue: listener mail.

Apr 12, 2020

Megan Boyle is the guest. Her novel LIVEBLOG is available from Tyrant Books.

This is Megan's second time on the program. She first appeared in Episode 13 on October 30, 2011.

Boyle is also the author of selected unpublished blog posts of a mexican panda express employee (Muumuu House, 2011). Her writing has appeared in Vice, the Believer, Thought Catalog, and other places online and in print. She has been liveblogging her life since March 17, 2020 on her Tumblr. She lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

In today's monologue, I talk about the hippie who is living with us and how she wanted to go to the forest.

Apr 8, 2020

Crissy Van Meter is the guest. Her debut novel, Creatures, is available from Algonquin Books.

She teaches creative writing at The Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College and is the founder of the literary project Five Quarterly. She's also the managing editor for Nouvella Books and serves on the board of directors for the literary non-profit Novelly. She lives in Los Angeles.

In today's monologue, I respond to listener mail.

Apr 5, 2020

Sarah Kendzior is the guest. Her new book, Hiding in Plain Sight: The Invention of Donald Trump and the Erosion of America, is available from Flatiron Books.

This is Sarah's second time on the podcast. She first appeared in Episode 516 on April 25, 2018.

She is best known for her reporting on St. Louis and the 2016 election, her academic research on authoritarian states, and her New York Times bestselling debut The View from Flyover Country. She is a co-host of the podcast Gaslit Nation and was named one of Foreign Policy's “100 people you should be following on Twitter to make sense of global events.” Her reporting has been featured in PoliticoThe Atlantic, Fast Company, The New York Times, Globe and Mail, and more. She lives in St. Louis.

In today's monologue, I basically just get right to the conversation.

Apr 1, 2020

Jenn Shapland is the guest. Her debut, My Autobiography of Carson McCullers, is a genre-bending work of nonfiction. It is available from Tin House Books.

Shapland's nonfiction has been published in O, the Oprah Magazine, The Paris Review dailyTin HouseOutside ​onlineLit Huband elsewhere. Her essay "Finders, Keepers" won a 2017 Pushcart Prize, and she was awarded the 2019 Rabkin Foundation Award for art journalism. She has a PhD in English from the University of Texas at Austin and lives in New Mexico.

In today's monologue, I talk about April Fool's Day, the late Molly Brodak, and offer a public thanks to my volunteer transcriptionists.

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